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Re: Postings on Darwin's Theory

From: Venkat Nagarajan (nagarajv_at_pathcom.com)
Date: Fri May 07 1999 - 18:36:41 PDT

Dear Bhagavatas,


I am writing in regards to the posting s on Darwin's Theory.  I do not know
the details of this theory, so I cannot comment on whether it can be
interpreted in a way that is in accordance with scripture.  However, I can
confidently say that the issue of whether it can be interpreted in a way
that is in accordance with scripture is irrelevant.  I think that Sri.
Anand's posting also expresses the same.

Mani is correct when he says that scripture must be interpreted in
accordance with perception; however, note this statement does not refer to
us, but to an Acharyan who is capable of such a task.
Mani's posting merely says that it is possible that there can (may) be many
scientific discoveries which (were) are in accordance with scriptural
interpretations provided by our Acharyas.

If one has a true conviction or at least a faith that moksha is the ultimate
goal, then what follows is relevant.

1.  The universal set of knowledge (including mundane knowledge) is
infinite.  All of us are dwelling in the finite; that is, we are all subject
to the limitations of body, mind and language.  It is impossible to know
everything there is to know, while subject to these limitations.

2.  Always keep the purpose of life in mind, and remember every action you
perform should be to achieve that purpose, if it is not then it is
fruitless.  The goal is to move towards making every action you take to be
in accordance with this goal.

3.  Assuming your Karma is such that you are not in a field which involves
studying Darwin's theory,  In what way is reconciling Darwin's theory with
scripture relevant to the ultimate goal?  Our true nature is all knowing
knowledge, but the problem is we don't know that we know everything there is
to know!  Pursuit of mundane knowledge solely for the sake of self
gratification will not result in all knowing knowledge, but only misery.


Adiyen