You are here: Sri Vaishnava Home Page : Bhakti List : Archives : July 1999

(no subject)

From: Balaji Ramanujam (balaji7_at_yahoo.com)
Date: Wed Jul 07 1999 - 06:51:35 PDT

From: Anantha Krishna <ankru@hotmail.com>Subject: Re :
pursuit of wealth
Date: Tue, 06 Jul 1999 16:24:30 PDTMIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowedMani's question
:
>Here's the bottom line question: is a detached,
unmaterialistic
>life religiously necessary? Is it possible? If so,
how does one
>go about it? To what extent should one pursue wealth,
if one
>is truly desirous of liberation?
It is clear that our karmas bind us into this life(s)
and to overcomethis 
karma we have to surrender to HIM through HIS grace to
get HIS grace.We are 
here to get rid of this bondage and also avoid actions
which can causethis 
bondage again. Surrendering is an act of a soul and
the result is HISgrace. 
After we completely surrender, our actions must be
such that it willnot 
result in accumulating more karmas which can result in
another bondage.
Having done this surrendering act of the soul and
realizing what cancause 
accumulation of karma (bondage), accepting wealth
worth your actions isnot 
a sin. You are not involved in an act which
accumulates karma if thiswealth 
earned is worth your actions. There is no wrong in
earning more if your
actions are worth the wealth you get and these actions
do not involvein any 
act which may be a cause for bondage. By this you know
what you deserveand 
also have your soul focused on achieving its ultimate
goal through HIS 
grace. The soul should never get involved in the
actions of acquiringwealth 
but should just act as a police avoiding actions which
can causebondage. 
This controlled actions of the body to acquire the
wealth it deserves, 
should not distract the soul from its crave for HIS
grace which is what
causes misery and distress.
regards,
AnanthaKrishna
-----------------------------------------------------
Mani:
Here's the bottom line question: is a detached,
unmaterialistic
>life religiously necessary? Is it possible? If so,
how does one
>go about it? To what extent should one pursue wealth,
if one
>is truly desirous of liberation?

Like science has taught us, every action has an equal
and opposite reaction. And we're also taught to study
the cause and effect.
Albert Einstein had to repent for his "contribution"
to mankind after his idea was (mis)used for making the
atom bomb.
In this world of "Karma" it is not always possible to
do something beneficial to mankind and at the same
time look into personal gains. And when do we decide
that we benefited enough or our actions have benefited
the world enough?
Yudhishtira was supposed to have passed through hell
(though for a brief period) for his "Ashwatthamo hatha
 Kunjara" But the other question there is, will he not
have surrendered at the feet of Lord KRISHNA and why
was he not granted "Moksha" directly? Maybe this story
is wrong since I cannot, at this point, attach the
text that purports this.

Godsend people like Alavandar had someone to remind
him of where he actually belongs and what his mission
was.
Do we wait for someone to do the same to us but after
we've had some life of a king like him?
We all know Lakshmi belongs to Narayana but I
certainly cant think of total surrendrence to Narayana
until Lakshmi has bestowed me with enough material
wealth. Why am I a freak Sri Vasihanava craving for
Lakshmi's grace in more ways than one? 

By exhausting my quota of "karmas" that I have carried
forward but at the same time trying to reap material
benefits out of it, I am only going to earn more
"Karmas" in turn.
Do we set a limit for ourselves with our goals well
defined? But then if only we could predict what
tomorrow holds for us in order to do all this...

Akinchana,
Balaji
_________________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com